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Biography
  • click here for a timeline of Pierre Berton's books
  • Pierre Berton spent his early newspaper career in Vancouver, where at 21 he was the youngest city editor on any Canadian daily. He moved to Toronto in 1947, and at the age of 31 was named managing editor of Maclean's magazine. In 1957, he became a key member of the CBC's public affairs flagship program, Close-Up, and a permanent panelist on Front Page Challenge. He joined The Toronto Star as associate editor and columnist in 1958, leaving in 1962 to commence The Pierre Berton Show, which ran until 1973

    For the Love of History
    Prisoners of the North
    The Joy of Writing
    Cats I Have Known and Loved
    Marching as to War
    My Country
    Niagara
    The Promised Land
    The Secret World of Og
    The Arctic Grail
    The Great Depression
    Klondike
    Vimy
    Flames Across the Border
    The Invasion of Canada
    The Last Spike
    The National Dream
    Welcome To The 21st Century
    Worth Repeating
    1967
    My Times

     

    cover For the Love of History

    Featuring some of Canada's best known and most admired historians, this collection will appeal to Pierre Berton fans and history lovers everywhere.

    For the Love of History features the contributions of outstanding writers who have won recognition for the creative and colourful ways in which they have popularized Canadian history. Including a ... click for more>

    cover Prisoners of the North

    Canada's master storyteller returns to the North to chronicle the extraordinary stories of five inspiring and controversial characters.

    Canada’s master storyteller returns to the North to bring history to life. Prisoners of the North tells the extraordinary stories of five inspiring and controversial characters whose adventures in Canada’s frozen wilderness are no... click for more>
    Also available in Hardcover

    cover The Joy of Writing

    Drawing on his fifty years as an award-winning journalist and author of some of the finest books on Canadian history, Pierre Berton has written a witty and practical guide for writers. With almost every book a bestseller, clearly this writer knows what it takes to succeed in the publishing world. From... click for more>

    cover Cats I Have Known and Loved

    Who would have guessed that one of the great historian’s passions in life is cats? Over the course of his eighty-two years, and from his birthplace in Dawson City, Yukon, to his home in Kleinburg, Ontario, Berton has known and loved many cats. In this charming collection of stories, he has... click for more>

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    cover Marching as to War

    “I have called this period Canada’s Turbulent Years – turbulent not only because of the battles we fought on the African veldt, the ravaged meadows of Flanders, the forbidding spine of Italy, and the conical hills of Korea, but turbulent in other ways. These were Canada’s formative years, when she resembled... click for more>

    cover My Country

    Berton brings the past alive with true stories of mystery and romance, tragedy and heroism, from the piracy of Bill Johnston, scourge of the St. Lawrence, to the weird saga of Brother XII and his mystic cult on Vancouver Island. click for more>

    cover Niagara

    Full of heroes and villains, eccentrics and daredevils, scientists, and power brokers, Niagara has a contemporary resonance: how a great natural wonder created both the industrial heartland of southern Ontario and the worst pollution on the continent. click for more>

    cover The Promised Land

    After the pioneers described in The National Dream, The Last Spike and Klondike came the settlers — a million people who filled a thousand miles of prairie in a single generation. click for more>

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    cover The Secret World of Og

    The Canadian classic, written by Pierre Berton and illustrated by his daughter, Patsy, has sold more than 200,000 copies in four editions. A favourite of young readers and their parents alike, The Secret World of Og is available once again, for a new generation of children.

    In this fantasy adventure, four children... click for more>

    cover The Arctic Grail

    Scores of nineteenth-century expeditions battled savage cold, relentless ice and winter darkness in pursuit of two great prizes: the quest for the elusive Passage linking the Atlantic and the Pacific and the international race to reach the North Pole. Pierre Berton's #1 best-selling book brings to life the great explorers: the... click for more>

    cover The Great Depression

    Over 1.5 million Canadians were on relief, one in five was a public dependant, and 70,000 young men travelled like hoboes. Ordinary citizens were rioting in the streets, but their demonstrations met with indifference, and dissidents were jailed. Canada emerged from the Great Depression a different nation.

    The most searing decade in... click for more>

    cover Klondike

    With the building of the railroad and the settlement of the plains, the North West was opening up. The Klondike stampede was a wild interlude in the epic story of western development, and here are its dramatic tales of hardship, heroism, and villainy. We meet Soapy Smith, dictator of Skagway; Swiftwater... click for more>

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    cover Vimy

    One chill Easter dawn in 1917, a blizzard blowing in their faces, the four divisions of the Canadian Corps in France went over the top of a muddy scarp knows as Vimy Ridge. Within hours, they held in their grasp what had eluded both British and French armies in over two... click for more>

    cover Flames Across the Border

    The Canada – U.S. border was in flames as the War of 1812 continued. York's parliament buildings were on fire, Niagara-on-the-Lake burned to the ground and Buffalo lay in ashes. Even the American capital of Washington, far to the south, was put to the torch. The War of 1812 had become... click for more>

    cover The Invasion of Canada

    To America's leaders in 1812, an invasion of Canada seemed to be "a mere matter of marching," as Thomas Jefferson confidently predicted. How could a nation of 8 million fail to subdue a struggling colony of 300,000? Yet, when the campaign of 1812 ended, the only Americans left on Canadian soil... click for more>

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    cover The Last Spike

    In the four years between 1881 and 1885, Canada was forged into one nation by the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The Last Spike reconstructs the incredible story of how some 2,000 miles of steel crossed the continent in just five years — exactly half the time stipulated in the... click for more>

    cover The National Dream

    In 1871, a tiny nation, just four years old — it's population well below the 4 million mark — determined that it would build the world's longest railroad across empty country, much of it unexplored. This decision — bold to the point of recklessness — was to change the lives of... click for more>

    cover Welcome To The 21st Century

    The monarchy, the movies, and everything in between is lampooned in this humorous retrospective of twentieth-century follies, foibles and fads from Canada's preeminent popular historian. Berton even ventures a look into the future, when in 2021, Chicago and New York launch the first 22-lane highways: they are designed for a speed... click for more>

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    cover Worth Repeating

    This glorious miscellany of many of Pierre Berton's most sparkling pieces brings back lost treasures from his years as a journalist covering Canada and the world. Worth Repeating is a treat to read, but it's also a valuable reminder of Berton's fifty years of extraordinary contributions to reporting and social commentary.

    Writing... click for more>

    cover 1967

    Few Canadians over the age of forty can forget the feeling of joy and celebration that washed over the country during Canada's centennial year. We were, Pierre Berton reminds us, a nation in love with itself, basking in the warm glow of international applause brought on by the unexpected success of... click for more>

    cover My Times

    For fifty years Canadians have had a standing date with Pierre Berton--in Maclean's and The Toronto Star, on the TV screen in Front Page Challenge and The Pierre Berton Show, and in each of his successive bestsellers. In his passion for truth and justice, he has taken on issues few others... click for more>

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    Photo Album
    Remembering Pierre
    Berton House Writers Retreat
    Journalist

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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